Is Everything You Hear About HVAC Maintenance the Wise Thing to Do?

You get a lot of advice about the operation and maintenance of your HVAC system from your neighbors, friends, relatives, and even HVAC industry professionals. Maybe you’ve thought that some of the things you hear might not necessarily be gospel. In fact, some may be put to rest as common HVAC myths. Here are a few you can dispute with authority.

1. You can cool (or heat) your home a lot faster if you crank up the A/C or crank down the heating.

No, no, no. You will not cool or heat your home any faster by radically changing the thermostat settings. Your HVAC system works by turning on or off at one speed. Turning it extremely high or low will not get you cooler or warmer any faster. In fact, it could do harm by making your system run longer as it struggles to reach the unreasonably high or low setting you’ve called for.

2. Turning the system on and off frequently saves energy.

Probably not. Turning the equipment on and off usually requires more energy. For best results, install a programmable thermostat, set a program, and keep to it. Reduce heating or cooling a few degrees in the daytime when you’re away from home and at night when you’re sleeping; set the temperature for a more comfortable setting when you’re moving about the home.

3. Replace your old or failing HVAC system with a bigger size than you have.

This is a huge sin. Bigger is not better, and you shouldn’t trust any HVAC consultant who recommends it. An HVAC that’s too big will short-cycle and waste money. The best way to size a system is for the consultant to visit your home and note specific data — number of occupants; how the home is oriented; how many windows; square footage. The data should be input into HVAC industry software and the correct size calculated by the program.

For more on common HVAC myths, contact NisAir Air Conditioning and Heating. We serve Martin, Palm Peach and Indian River counties.

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